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Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Kaua'i, Okina, A'a

     Aloha from Hanalei Bay in Kaua'i.

     Due to technical difficulties, Partial Ellipsis of the Sun will be taking the week off.

     There were wonderful things about the okina (the unicameral glottal stop of a "backward apostrophe"), the original unicase or unicameral Hawaiian language (ron, jan---you were made for Hawaiian), and the a'a lava here... but my iPad is not cooperating and will only work in HTML mode. Also, I've been swimming with large sea turtles, fish and eels and need to get back there for the afternoon Anini swim ;-).

     However, there is an interesting NPR story link on the first land-walking fish, Tikaalik (which does incorporate that a'a). :

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/01/14/262464764/first-land-walking-fish-looks-like-it-had-all-wheel-drive?utm_content=socialflow&utm_campaign=nprfacebook&utm_source=npr&utm_medium=facebook


    Until next week, I shall try to embed a few photographs here. We'll see how it goes.


                                                          

                                                           Hanalei Bay "downtown" 




                                                             

                                                              Hibiscus flower



                      

                                                           Anini (not Wanini) Beach





                                                   Hanalei Bay, dragon head to tail...



                                                                  Palm trees, of course




   View from our lanai. . .


  And, lastly, wild roosters everywhere on the island:




Mahalo,

Word Woman (Scientific Steph)

8 comments:

  1. The fringing reefs don't look very healthy at all. The shy sea urchins were hidden in every nook and cranny...and that sea turtle sure kept an eye on me, especially above the water. There were a few new coral growths in neon green, purple, orange and white but most looked pretty beaten down and stressed.

    Our plan is to go to Waimea Canyon tomorrow to check out the rock formations and do a little a'a hiking. Six million years is so young for this island, yet old enough to have formed rich, deep-red soil everywhere. Taro abounds in Hanalei Bay, though I tend to prefer the ahi for a local treat ;-).

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  2. SS,
    Beautiful photos. Sorry about your stubborn iPad, but you deserve a break from PEOTS anyway. Still, your are providing us your normal Tuesday posting with an interesting link , Hawaiian linguistics, pix, and other food for thinking.

    Sounds like you’re having a great vacation. I look forward to next week’s PEOTS.
    LL

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    Replies
    1. hi lego,

      thanks for posting. glad it made sense! i am trying writing in unicameral style. predictive text is not happy but i am. ;-)

      i did learn how to put in paragraph breaks and embed photos so learning something new is always fun.

      hope things are good in wisconsin. ok, it looks very weird to see no capital letter there in wi but the hawai'ian gods and goddesses are pleased.

      aloha from lihu'e.

      steph

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  3. Had some wahini tahini for lunch. Not quite ahi.

    Hi Cat! Safe travels to "refrigerator-land."

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  4. Multiple meanings, careful pronunciation...It may take awhile to learn Hawai'ian: here's a start:

    http://hawaiian-words.com/home/hawaiian-dictionary/

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  5. It's been over twenty years since I have been to Kauai, but I hope to return someday. I'm very excited to be heading to the Big Island for the first time in a few weeks, followed by time in Honolulu with my daughter and son-in-law.

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    Replies
    1. Have a wonderful trip, Joanne! It was my first trip to Hawai'i and I plan to return also.

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  6. This article on genetically engineered corn fits here on the Hawaii blog. . .I may yet revisit GMO's in an upcoming blog.

    http://news.yahoo.com/hawaii-genetically-engineered-crop-flash-point-135158617.html


    Wow...90 % of U.S. corn is genetically modified.

    Three growing seasons in Hawaii mean a faster turn-around for the genetically engineered corn.

    I am heartened to see my friends with young children expressing concern about GMO's, dyes in Easter egg kits, and becoming part of the slow foods and farming/gardening communities. Lucky kids!

    Back to Easter Eggs...fast forward three months...







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