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Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Fluoride and Fluorite: First Change since 1962: Decreased Levels of Recommended Fluoride in Drinking Water by the United States

          On Monday, April 27, 2015, the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services decreased the recommended amount of added fluorite in drinking water to about half the original recommendation. It is the first change in the recommended amount since 1962.



       
          The main documented side effect to over-fluoridation is fluorosis, a condition marked by white marks on the teeth. There are proven great benefits to low fluoride amounts to decreasing dental caries. Most people in the U. S are already getting fluoride directly on their teeth in the form of toothpaste and dental rinses. The NPR link above notes some believe fluoridation at higher levels is linked to other problems including thyroid issues, skeletal fluorosis, and ADHD.





           Much of the western world has already eliminated or decreased fluoride amounts in water supplies. There are some areas of the world that have naturally occurring fluoride which is over 1.5 mg/l (See world map here.) The high fluoride levels are linked to types of granite with the naturally occurring fluorite mineral (the purplish mineral in the pinkish granite below):




           The mineral fluorite, CaF2, is a member of the halide sequence.



          And, of course, fluorite is the namesake poster child for fluorescence under ultraviolet light:



          I am curious to hear about your views on the fluoride controversy. What is yours? Surely, the decreasing of the acceptable level by half is significant. 

Going with the fluo,

Steph




36 comments:

  1. Here in New Jersey, we're not up to arguing about whether to fluoridate at the old, higher, or the new, lower level. For the most part, we don't fluoridate at all. Ridiculous!

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    1. Wow, I was surprised at the wide fluctuations amongst the states.

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    2. Make that wide fluoctuations ;-).

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    3. Maybe we could convince some wildcatters to add fluoride to their fracking fluid?

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    4. OK, that was worth a big laugh! Thanks, jan.

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    5. Sheesh! This makes absolutely no sense: "If they have potatoes, the child will also need bread to go along with it. "

      What the frack?!

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    6. Yeah, I have a feeling the article wasn't edited by a nutritionist...

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    7. Well, since we were talking about kids' lunches check out Girl With a Pearl Earring Lunch Box Art

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    8. Well, since we were talking about kids' lunches check out Girl With a Pearl Earring Lunch Box Art

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    9. I have admiration, envy, and loathing for people with that much artistic talent and time on their hands.

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  2. I wouldn't say that I'm anti-EmDrive. But without conservation of momentum, I'd say I don't think we're in Kansas anymore, Toto.

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  3. Replies
    1. Not as widespread as the Permian extinction but still devastating.

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  4. My hometown, Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, is known for its pure water. When I was a boy, the water I drank elsewhere, even in nearby Eau Claire, ironically, tasted funny. I refused to drink all but Chippewa Falls tap water. I think I recall my elders telling me that other water tasted odd to me because other cities added fluoride to their water supply. I am not sure, however, if that was true.

    As I have aged, and taste buds and brain cells have died off, all taps water now tastes the same to me.

    LegoWaterSnob

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    1. Funny, my in-laws used to have a house on Martha's Vineyard with well water that left rust stains and tasted ironic, literally. For drinking water, we would fill plastic bottles from an always-running artesian well a half-mile away that supplied a fire-department connector and drained into Menemsha Pond. My sister-in-law would mimic bottled water ads, whispering, "From a single rusty pipe..."

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    2. Soft water tastes funny to me.

      We drank the water in Sonora, Mexico, when I worked there--the first night. After being sicker than I have ever been, I stuck with bottled water for the rest of the six months.

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    3. Lego, how high are the falls in Chippewa Falls?

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    4. Lego, how high are the falls in Chippewa Falls?

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    5. Lego, how high are the falls in Chippewa Falls?

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    6. On second, more lucid thought, perhaps it was chlorine, not fluoride, in the neighboring cities’ water supply. Is fluoride tastless? Like a poker-playing-pups painting or velvet Elvis wall hanging?

      The real “Falls” of Chippewa is on the Chippewa River, below the Northern States Power damn near downtown. But there is also a more scenic falls below the Glen Loch dam in our wonderful Irvine Park. Duncan Creek runs through the park, and flowed across the street from my boyhood home. Above the Glen Loch dam was (still is?) a damn fine swimming hole/haunt for teens. Here are some photos .

      LegoFallsGuy

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    7. I believe fluoride is tasteless, just like black velvet Elvis, Lego.

      So, guesstimating from the images you linked to, maybe 10-12 feet high for Chippewa Falls?

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  5. Replies
    1. So they were the 'real' pilgrims ‽

      If I don't use it, I lose it.

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    2. You are liking that interrobang lately, Paul. . .

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    3. Yeah, I give it the thumb's up.

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    4. Have you seen this?

      " irony punctuation ⸮ "

      We may need to stock up on those ⸮ . . .!

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  6. Latest post on "Century-Old Cat Tongue: Papillae-On" is up.

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