Total Pageviews

Friday, February 24, 2017

Dendritic Images: From Gems to Streams: AGate-Way Drug?


     Herewith: some striking geologic/gemologic/geomorphologic images of a dendritic, or tree-like branching, nature this week. {Most of my allotted words have been used up on SAT preparation for six juniors this week.} I've chosen to focus on the geologic dendrite set, though dendrites are found throughout the body's cells and organs, in various microscopic growth patterns, and many other areas.

      1. Australian opal with a dendritic pattern



      2.  Copper dendrite growth





        3. Manganese oxide growth on limestone slab



4. Dendritic pattern in agates (Agate-way drug)





5. Dendritic pattern in unusual black and white opal:




6. Dendritic drainage pattern in geomorphology:


7. Dendritic, fractal growth in ice crystals

 

      8. Dendritic pattern of (actual) trees against the backdrop of the sheer rock walls of Zion National Park.


Brought to you by the Branch Chief,
Steph

24 comments:

  1. Meantime: when all the children are above average? ;-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're really focused on your students. I'm sure they'll do well :)

      Delete
    2. Thanks, Paul. I believe they will do well as long as they remember to breathe. . .

      Delete
  2. Replies
    1. Could a Leyden jar be a Lichtenstein?

      Delete
    2. Either that or a "Leydendrite."

      LeygoOrLaygoTryingToBeFrank(AndAllThatJazz)

      Delete
  3. NOT about dendrites: An "apparent geologist" (whoever that is) posted a beautiful malachite stalactite. . .well, then, read on (but, be aware, NSFW). Umm, interdisciplinary "research and analysis".

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Honestly! Just because it's longer than it's wide! Some people have such dirty minds. Sad.

      Delete
    2. Paul, that was fun.

      ****************************

      Today, SUN, is SAT. . .

      Delete
    3. Nice Melanieac find, Paul.
      Sometimes a rollerskate is just a rollerskate, and a key is just a key.

      LegoAdds:AndAStalactiteIsJustAStalactite

      Delete
  4. I remember a similar pattern when my windshield had a losing encounter with a rock. You can also see it occasionally in stucco or concrete cracks, particularly when there is an impact point.

    The floor plan of the Dipoli Conference Center in Finland loosely follows this pattern.

    I changed my profile pic to satisfy your prurient tastes; made from calcite, it's probably safer than malachite. But it's chilly in that cave!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. eco, while I appreciate the calcite image, malachite is harder (on Mohs hardness scale only, of course ;-)).

      Delete
  5. The word "scientist" was not coined until 1834 (!) by William Whewell. The new word was inspired by Mary Somerville, science writer and polymath.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Replies
    1. "Seat of consciousness" lends itself to a certain humorous(?) and quite obviously physically impossible image.
      But, if consciousness is just a glorified feedback loop, then I guess it comes down to will, aka, the strength to do what needs to be done.
      So, it's all in a big blue box.
      Or is it red.
      Or yellow.

      Delete
    2. Reminds me of Civil War General John Pope, who, to emphasize his aggressiveness in the field, sent dispatches with the dateline, "Headquarters in the Saddle", to which someone (Lincoln?) remarked that he had his headquarters where his hindquarters should be.

      Delete
    3. Reminds me of Tom Paxton's Talking Vietnam Potluck Blues:
      Hello, headquarters?

      Delete
    4. Headquarters, tails nickels?

      Delete
    5. "We have met the enemy, and he has been smashed."

      Or, via Pogo.

      Delete
  7. Just in case you are near the Smith College Bulb Show tomorrow evening.

    The bulb show helped me (and many other Smithies) survive early, snowy March in NoHo.

    ReplyDelete
  8. New post on "Tsingy, Tsingy, Tsingy: Extreme Karst Topography in Madagascar" is now up.

    ReplyDelete