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Sunday, April 2, 2017

Seven Unusual Landforms from the Giant Blue Eye of the Sahara to the Carnallite Salt Mines of Russia

      Seven unusual landforms are the focus of this somewhat trippy and anthropomorphic article about the "giant muscular space wizard that keeps our planet spinning and loses its balance, sending those mountains and rivers and oceans crashing together in unexpected ways." Here is the Giant Blue Eye of the Sahara in Mauritania, western Africa.




       Check out the article linked above to discover more about these odd landforms. Here are the dry, dry, dry carnallite salt mines in Russia, representing Asia:



       Number three on the Landforms List is The "Iceman's Pompadour," Antarctica:


  
      The Marble Caves of Chile are South America's contributions to the weird landform list:



      Number five on the list is Izvorul Bigar, the "Weeping Waterfall" of Romania, Europe. It is only 26 feet tall and the source of the dripping water is unknown.



      Number six, representing Australia/New Zealand is Split Apple Rock or "Toko Ngawha:"



      And last on the list is the second European location at "The Giant's Causeway" in Ireland:



      Nothing from North America made their list. How about Bryce Canyon hoodoos in Utah?



Or the Vermillion Cliffs of Arizona?



      We've discussed at least one of these landforms here at Partial Ellipsis of the Sun. Which one(s)?

What would make your list?
Steph








17 comments:

  1. I remember the Giant's Causeway from our discussion of columnar joints about 18 months ago.

    How about Spiral Jetty?

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    1. From the hand of the giant muscular space wizard?

      Perhaps. . .

      Delete
  2. That Weeping Waterfall in Romania reminds me a lot of Zion National Park's Weeping Rock feature.

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    1. Yes! I agree.

      And speaking of falls, I've been intrigued with a new book by Ed Sealover about "Colorado Excursions with History, Hikes, and Hops." There's triptych of things to do in each area, highlighting our enjoyment of history, hiking and beer. Maizie and I enjoyed Zapata Falls State Park just south of Great Sand Dunes NP.

      Delete
  3. OK, I know I'm weird, but this reminded me of this.

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    1. jan, we join you in your weirdness. Thanks for the "link."

      Delete
  4. Basaltic columns like those in Ireland and Scotland can also be found at Devils Postpile in California. The near perfect hexagon pavers at the top catch an architect's eye.

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    1. I've wondered if Devil's Tower in WY and Devil's Postpile in CA are so named for the dark color of the basalt and/or for the hexagonal shapes. . .

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    2. I thought ba salt was for sheep anyway. . .

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  5. I'll admit it, I'm a homer, but...
    Wisconsin and Minnesota just happen to be juggernauts of geologic joys!

    Okay, okay. Neither state is that great geologically. I'll admit that too.
    Minnesota is more famous for being the home of Frostbite Falls, the hometown not of ROCKY (who I believe resided in Brainerd, you betcha) but of BULLWINKLE.
    As for Wisconsin, Our Badgers could not even bury Florida in The NCAA tourney... let alone a cow carcass.

    LegoWhoHasSlimHopesOfGettingEmploymentAtTheMinnesotaOrWisconsinTourismBureaus

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    1. And you have great sand deposits, Lego. . .

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  6. But wouldn't it be better if everybody walked on an escalator? (Or jogged?)

    I once read a suggestion for the basis of a sci-fi story about an epidemic that only affects what used to be called Type-A people: it's a virus that's spread by pressing the "DOOR CLOSE" button on elevators.

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    1. Regulating the speed would be the tricky part, eh?

      The "DOOR CLOSE" virus idea is great.

      Delete
  7. New post on "Stephanie Wildlife Sanctuary and the Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project (HSPDP) in Southwestern Ethiopia" is now up.

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